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20121120
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
a single question, what are you willing to give. you know, when john boehner appears, they say are you willing to accept higher rates. no one says what are you going to do about entitlements or anything, there's no question of the president whether he will compromise and what that would look like. >> paul: steve, what do you think the republicans ought to do here? is there a way out for them or are they going to be pushed back into a corner where they have no choice, but to concede that they have to raise tax rates or else go over the cliff and get blamed for that? >> well, it's a tough situation for them. there's no question about it because as you know, the default position, if we don't do anything is for the taxes to go up on everybody on january 1st, and that's something i think both sides want to avoid. it's very interesting, the thing that happened this week to start the week, was who was the first person that barack obama met with in the white house since his election, the labor unions, the labor block, that tells a lot who is driving policy at least at the start of the second t
would be willing to accept and double the amount that speaker boehner had offered the president during their debt negotiations last year. today the president is scheduled to meet with ceos from a dozen companies. there's some of them on your screen. general electric, ford, ibm all playing a part. they'll discuss ways to work together and try to find a balanced approach to reducing the deficit. during a closed-door meeting yesterday with union leaders and liberal supporters, president obama reportedly vowed that he would, quote, not budge when it comes to letting the bush tax cuts expire for the country's highest earners. labor leader and president of the afl-cio, richard trumka, was among those at the white house meeting. he said he and the president are on the same page. >> we're very, very committed to making sure that the middle class and workers don't end up paying the tab for a party that we didn't get to go to. the president led with that notion of protecting the middle class, and now you have republicans that have it in their power, they could sign a bill tomorrow that protects
's about to happen in this building in an hour from now. speaker boehner, senator mcconnell, senator reid, democratic leader pelosi, all will come here and speak for a couple hours. day one of negotiations. nobody is expecting huge news but as jim has already tweeted out this morning, the market is going to look for signs that this tone of compromise that we've heard so much about all week long is that for real or are talks going to break down in early stages? the market specifically is going to depend on that tone today and we'll bring that live when the meeting happens a little after 10:00 a.m. >> we've seen reaction of futures to the possibility of a deal. we've been down for six of the past seven days but the dow this morning implied open is up 33 points. sapp looks s&p looks to add fiv. here we have italy down three-quarter percent and mixed bag for the rest. carl? okay. we're going to go to the road map this morning. that is where carl is in washington d.c. reports this morning that hard decisions surrounding deficit reduction could be kicked down the road until 2013 in favor of a s
driving the decisions made here. i think citing i believe speaker boehner, it's fair to say that the president also believes we don't -- he's not looking to box himself in or box other people's ideas out. as we approach the conversation that will be in on friday. >> suggest to the meeting that just took place they might have to give up more than they would like? >> i think the president has made very clear that everyone, throughout this process, not just in this past week since the election, but for some time now, that the whole point of compromise is that nobody gets to achieve their maximalist position. that was the approach we took throughout negotiations in 2011 and it's the principle the president has based his own proposals on. if you look at, again, the programs that the president has already cut through legislation he signed into law, if you look at the savings he's willing to enact as part of his plan, it demonstrates a willingness to give so that you can meet your negotiating partner somewhere in the middle and reach a deal. >> you don't have any specific -- >> i d
that siri has to offer me. >> stephanie: i think dictionary.com backs me up on john boehner. >> there are pronunciations i've had to look up. i don't know everything off the top of my head. >> she knows how to pronounce myanmar. >> i know how to use the googles, too. >> stephanie: all right. here she is with all of her fancy, highfalutin words. >> paul ryan lost on the national ticket but won back his seat in congress. he will be back at the table of negotiations continuing over tax increases and spending cuts. paul ryan will continue to head up the house budget committee and john boehner expects him to help as the two parties try to come to a compromise that would stave off the fiscal cliff generate revenue and reduce the deficit. the hope is that ryan can help bring around fellow conservatives. as senator patty murray points out to the "new york times," ryan will have to be willing to listen and compromise if he's going to stick to his former budget proposals, it will be a long winter. americans just vote
boehner says under the right conditions might be able to bargain. what are those? guest: i am cautiously optimistic that we will find some solution in a time. i think it would be irresponsible, a big it would be responsible for the president or either party to voluntarily drive off of the cliff. i think the key is that we want a smart balance to get the economy going, generate more revenue, as well as smart spending cuts. we really think those are conditions that actually get the economy going. and ensure our investors that we are serious about getting our financial house in order. i think working with the tax code is critical. i do not how -- see how we do this without during the fundamental tax reform. it the economy over the past three years had just been an average recovery, back where we were in 2009, our deficit would be cut in half this year. that goes a long way toward a balanced budget, with this we would get there, and fundamental tax reform is key to getting all of that capital off the sidelines, back to create the jobs we need pirouetting fundamental tax reform along with the
can pass the alternative. but it's your problem to get the votes. and boehner would be well put not to try to cut a deal with obama but instead to say paul ryan's going to bring a solution to the fix, we're going to gather votes for it. i guarantee you, you'll get the right to have a democratic substitute. and if you can get enough republicans to vote for it, terrific. but they do not have an obligation to concede that the only mandate in washington is the president's. >> you're talking about chains hiring people for 29 hours. i'm hearing that from small business owners across pensacola. >> yeah. >> my own district. on election night i got three different e-mails from small business owners going it's sad -- and i said this on the air a couple days ago. they said i'm going to have to put these people on for less than 30 hours and i'm going to lose my best people. i can choose to do that or fire six, seven people because my margins are so small i'm fighting to keep my business open. >> you track the number of layoffs and closures in the first week since the election, it's sobering
in congress are another. they have to come together. speaker boehner said he's willing to entertain more revenue. the president should take him up on that offer and they ought to come together and find some way through this. the republican party has got to take a good luook at what its future holds but a good start will be coming together to solve this problem. >> governor, nancy pelosi of course out this morning says she's going to run again for some leadership in the congress. is that a signal that the white house is going to remain more partisan perhaps than some hope? >> actually, i don't think so. you know, nancy pelosi was the one who produced the votes for the financial bailout. you all recall that. there weren't republican votes even when president bush proposed it and secretary paulson. nancy found the votes. nancy is good at finding the votes out of our progressive wing and the president will need votes from our progressive wing and nancy is a good person to do that. >> we'll see how things go down this afternoon and later in the week. governor, lanhee good to see you back. don
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)